WellSpan Home

Health Library

Transient Tachypnea of the Newborn

What is transient tachypnea of the newborn?

Transient tachypnea [TACK-up-NEE-uh] of the newborn is a mild breathing problem. It affects babies during the first hours of life. Transient means it is short-lived. Tachypnea means fast breathing rate. The problem usually goes away without treatment in about 3 days.

What causes transient tachypnea of the newborn?

Before babies are born, they have fluid in their lungs. Babies push out some of that fluid before birth. More fluid gets pushed out as they pass through the birth canal during delivery. The rest of the fluid is absorbed into the lungs after they are born and start breathing on their own. If the fluid isn't absorbed fast enough or if they have too much fluid in the lungs, they can't take in oxygen very well. Babies with this problem have to breathe faster and harder to get enough oxygen into the lungs.

Who is at risk for transient tachypnea of the newborn?

Only a small number of all newborn babies get this breathing problem. Although premature babies can have it, most babies with this problem are full-term. Babies delivered by cesarean section are more likely to have this because the fluid in the lungs doesn’t get squeezed out of their lungs as it does during a vaginal birth. Babies of moms with asthma and diabetes may also be more likely to have condition.

What are the symptoms of transient tachypnea of the newborn?

Symptoms may occur a bit differently in each child. They can include:

  • Rapid breathing rate of more than 60 breaths per minute
  • Grunting sounds with breathing
  • Flaring of the nostrils
  • Pulling in at the ribs with breathing

The symptoms of this breathing problem can look like other health conditions. Make sure your child sees his or her healthcare provider for a diagnosis.

How is transient tachypnea of the newborn diagnosed?

Your baby's healthcare provider may use a chest X-ray to help diagnose the problem. On X-ray, the lungs look streaked and overinflated. The symptoms of this breathing problem may be similar to other more serious respiratory problems. These include respiratory distress syndrome. Often transient tachypnea of the newborn is diagnosed when symptoms suddenly go away by the third day of life.

How is transient tachypnea of the newborn treated?

Usually the problem goes away on its own in about 3 days. Treatment will depend on your child’s symptoms, age, and general health. It will also depend on how severe the condition is.

Treatment may include:

  • Supplemental oxygen. Oxygen is given to your baby by placing mask on the face or by putting your baby under an oxygen hood.
  • Blood tests. These tests measure the amount of oxygen in your baby’s blood.
  • Continuous positive airway pressure. This treatment uses a mechanical breathing machine. The machine pushes a continuous flow of air to your baby’s airways to help keep tiny air passages in the lungs open.
  • Tube feeding. Your baby may need this if his or her breathing rate is too high. This will help keep your baby from breathing in food from the mouth into the lungs.

Once the problem goes away, your baby should get better quickly. He or she should not have a higher risk for other breathing or long-term problems.

Key points about transient tachypnea of the newborn

  • Transient tachypnea of the newborn is a mild breathing problem. It affects babies soon after birth and lasts about 3 days.
  • The problem usually goes away on its own.
  • Treatment may include supplemental oxygen, blood tests, and continuous positive airway pressure.
  • Once the problem goes away, your baby should get better quickly. He or she should not have a higher risk for other breathing or long-term problems.

Next steps

Tips to help you get the most from a visit to your child’s healthcare provider:

  • Know the reason for the visit and what you want to happen.
  • Before your visit, write down questions you want answered.
  • At the visit, write down the name of a new diagnosis, and any new medicines, treatments, or tests. Also write down any new instructions your provider gives you for your child.
  • Know why a new medicine or treatment is prescribed and how it will help your child. Also know what the side effects are.
  • Ask if your child’s condition can be treated in other ways.
  • Know why a test or procedure is recommended and what the results could mean.
  • Know what to expect if your child does not take the medicine or have the test or procedure.
  • If your child has a follow-up appointment, write down the date, time, and purpose for that visit.
  • Know how you can contact your child’s provider after office hours. This is important if your child becomes ill and you have questions or need advice.
Transient Tachypnea of the Newborn - WellSpan Health

Online Medical Reviewer: Berry, Judith, PhD, APRN
Online Medical Reviewer: Goode, Paula, RN, BSN, MSN
Last Review Date: 2015-06-23T00:00:00
Last Modified Date: 2016-07-28T00:00:00
Published Date: 2016-07-28T00:00:00
Last Review Date: 2007-03-30T00:00:00
© 2016 WellSpan Health. All Rights Reserved. This information is not intended as a substitute for professional medical care. Always follow your healthcare professional's instructions.

Are you sure you would like to cancel?

All information will be lost.

Yes No ×

About the provider search

This search will provide you with WellSpan Medical Group and Northern Lancaster County (Ephrata) Medical Group primary care physicians and specialists. If we don’t have a WellSpan Medical Group physician to meet your criteria, the search will expand to include community physicians who partner with WellSpan Medical Group physicians through the WellSpan Provider Network or provide care to patients on the Medical Staffs of WellSpan’s Hospitals.

×

Schedule Your Next Appointment Online with MyWellSpan

Use your MyWellSpan patient portal any time to view available appointments, and pick the date and time that best suits your schedule.

Go to MyWellSpan

New to this practice?

If you don't have a WellSpan primary care provider and would like to schedule a new patient appointment with a provider who is accepting patients, just log into your MyWellSpan account, and go to the Appointment Center section. As you progress through the scheduling process, you will be able to see the offices that are accepting new patients in relation to your zip code. If you are not enrolled in MyWellSpan, go to https://my.wellspan.org, call 1-866-638-1842 or speak with a member of the staff at a participating facility to sign up. New patient scheduling not available at all practices/programs.

Already a patient at this practice?

If you already have a relationship with a WellSpan practice, simply log into your account, and go to the Appointment Center section. As you progress through the scheduling process, you will be able to schedule an appointment with any provider or practice that already counts you as a patient. Online scheduling varies by practice/program.

×